Interview: Fine Points Talk New Album and More

Fine Points

Fine Points is a band out of San Francisco. The band recently played a stretch of West Coast dates to support Take Shape being out. Evan took some time to answers our questions about the band, the SF music scene, and more.

THow did Fine Points initially start?

Evan: Matt and I have spent the last ten years writing, recording, and touring with Sleepy Sun. We started Fine Points on our off time because we just can’t get enough, ya know? I wanted this band to have an expansive sound that relied on pop sensibilities.

What’s it like playing music in a city like San Francisco on a regular basis?

Evan:  I love playing music with my friends here in the bay. It’s my favorite activity.  I was born in SF and still think it’s one of the most beautiful cities in the world. There are incredible rooms to play in and an awesomely varied selection of music to check out. That being said, the bay area has turned into a tech-driven wasteland with no middle class.  There are gigantic homeless encampments that share the same block with multi-million dollar high rise condominiums. The camaraderie amongst artists and musicians is still here but lots of talented gals and guys have been priced out to more affordable areas of the country. This is unfortunate since the city used to be a hub for creativity and self-expression.

Do you have a favorite local spot?

Evan: La Casita in East Oakland. Best Chilaquiles in the game. Cash only! If we’re talking music venues, The Chapel is my favorite place to play.

Let’s talk about Take Shape now. How did you end up working with Jason Carmer on it?

Evan: Jason contacted us on ye’ ol internet and asked if we’d like to record a song at his ‘Outland Studios’ in Berkeley. That song ended up being “The Fang.” We really liked how it sounded and ended up doin’ the whole damn thing at his joint.

When the band starts working on songs, what is the process like? Do you all work together or does it start with one person and then everyone else is brought in on it?

Evan: All of the songs start with either Matt or myself creating the basic structure. If Matt brings in a song, I will make suggestions and add lyrics to it. If I bring in a song, it usually has words on there already and Matt adds parts and helps piece it together. Then Josh (drums) and Owen (bass/keys) throw their respective magical potions into the pot. If we’re lucky, we’ll get our talented friends to play or sing on recordings, too.

Which song do you feel is the most personal on the album and why?

Evan: “The Fang” has a lot of gravity to it. It was written as a dedication to a pal of mine who passed away soon after the tune was written and recorded. A song is a nice way to remember.

How would you describe your sound to people who have yet to listen to the band? Where do you draw your influences from?

Evan: Narco pop. Dream gaze. We got a lot of comparisons to Britpop bands on this last west coast tour which I love: “You guys sound like a British band without the accent.” I love all things Creation records (MBV, Oasis, P Scream, Jam Chain) as well as The Cure and The Verve. The record also draws from stuff like Lee Hazlewood’s saccharine underground and Phil Spector’s wall of sound. Country music (i.e. Waylon, Merle, George J., Buck, Patsy, and Glen Campbell) is big for me, too. I look to Brian Wilson for vocal harmony lessons. All the classics!

What is the band up to for the rest of 2018?

Evan: I love how the live band is sounding at the moment. I’d like to play the new tunes out as much as we can. Sell some records?  We have a sweet Velvet Underground cover that we want to put out this year. Velvets forever.

Where is the best place to keep up with the band?

Evan: We got some more west coast dates lined up in September. Other than that, you’ll find us floating on a swan-shaped inflatable pool toy somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. Also, www.finepointsmusic.com and pretty much all of the crap social media websites that are available to mankind.

Interview: The Young & Restless Discuss Recent Music and What’s Next

The Young & Restless

The Young & Restless took time to talk to us about their most recent EP, their new single, and much more. Check out the interview.

With Horizon having been out for a little over a year now, how would you say you’ve progressed as a band since then?

Well the Horizon EP was very different compared to our first EP, Leave Us To Our Own Devices, as it really demonstrated the progression as a band, we were aiming for a more modern pop punk sound, the lyrical style and musical composition was a lot more angsty compared to our first EP too, where as the first EP has that more nostalgic late 90s/Early 00s feel, it was a bit more anthemic, upbeat and about having a good time,

With the new single “Family Values” it took more of an emotionally raw turn, right from the very moment the first verse kicks in, it catches you right off guard and throws you right in the deep end, it’s full throttle right from get go to the very end.

What was your writing and recording process like for “Family Values”?

The song was recorded by Ed Sokolowski at EAS Studios in Milton Keynes, he recorded both our first and second EP, this  guy is amazing, he’s not just a guy who sits behind a desk and presses record, he really gets involved in the whole process, it’s like we’ve said before it’s as if he becomes another member of TY&R, he really did make the song what it is and it’s always a pleasure working with him. The recording process itself was fairly straight forward, we demoed the song in a day to help give Ed a better idea of the direction the song was going in, there was a complete change up in the melody and rhythm of the lyrics, it was quite a mess to begin with! But with Ed’s magic he helped tidy everything all up, then the actual recording process took place over 3 days.

What was the inspiration behind the song?

It’s about the typical scenario of a broken home, sure that could mean a lot of things, but we wanted it to be something people can relate to no matter what the circumstances could be, and these things can have a traumatic impact on you when growing up, at a first impression the music is quite upbeat, until it the opening line comes in and slaps you straight in the face, but after all the said and done, it gets better, no matter what.

Are there plans for another EP or a full length in the works?

We are forever writing and coming up with new ideas for songs, it would be amazing to eventually do a debut full length, we might even do another EP, it’s yet to be decided.

What will you be working on for the rest of 2018?

We have a 3 date tour coming up at the start August, then we shall be taking some time out from gigging to focus on writing and getting some new material out, hopefully before the end of the year/start of next year!

Which venue in London is your favorite to play?

Our favourite place has to be The Black Heart in Camden, not only is it an amazing place to play, but it was also the first ever place we played in London two years ago, and remember it like it was yesterday! Camden is one of, if not the best hot spot for up and coming bands in London, great atmosphere, great sound, all in all a great place!

Speaking of shows, do you have any plans for a U.S. tour in the near future or is that something you’re hoping to do later down the line?

A U.S. tour would truly be a dream come true, it would be amazing to have a support slot with a big band on a big tour!

Thank you for your time! Where can our readers keep up with you?

You can keep up with us on a social media via the links below:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/theyoungandrestlessuk
Twitter: www.twitter.com/TYandRestlessUK
Instagram: www.instagram.com/theyoungandrestlessuk
Bandcamp: http://theyoungandrestlessuk.bandcamp.com
YouTube: https://bit.ly/2gZbxkj

Interview: In The Whale Talk Denver Music Scene and More

In The Whale

In The Whale are currently out on tour. They took some time to tell us about the Denver music scene, what it was like touring with The Descendents, and more.

With the band turning 7 this year, how would you say you’ve progressed since those early days?

We’ve grown quite a bit in popularity and our sound has grown quite a bit as well. We like to think we know a lot more about what it takes to survive in this industry. But we still have a lot to learn.

What is the local music scene like in Denver? Is it pretty tight-knit for a major city?

Honestly, we don’t spend much time at home these days as we’re trying to tour as much as we can. Sadly, we’ve lost touch with how the Denver scene has been lately, but we do have life long friends who are promoters and talent buyers and in bands in Denver.

How would you describe your sound to people who haven’t listened to the band before?

We would say if you haven’t listened to the band before, than just do it! Don’t wait for us to describe our sound to you, just find us on Spotify and listen and you’ll be good to go!

What was it like touring with The Descendants? What did you learn from being on the road with them?

Touring with the Descendents was an experience we’ll never forget. We were so flabbergasted and amazed that we were allowed to play with them that we didn’t really have time to learn much.

You’re on a headlining tour now, how is that going?

So far so good. The crowds have been great and we’re testing out new material from our new EP that seems to be going over very well.

What are your plans for the remainder of 2018?

Tour our butts off. Stack fat paper.

Thank you for your time. Where can readers keep up with the band?

www.inthewhalesucks.com

Or for upcoming tour dates: bandsintown.com/inthewhale

Interview: Gloomsday Talk New Album and San Diego Music Scene

Gloomsday

Gloomsday took some time to talk to us about Anxiety, Disbelief, Wonder., what the music scene is like in San Diego, CA, and more. Check it out.

When did the band first form and what made you decide on the name Gloomsday?

Gloomsday formed around 2010, but we had been playing together for a bit before that. We wanted to release something and realized we needed a name to go with it. As far as deciding on the name, it felt like it fit well with the sound we were creating. We borrow from a couple musical styles like doom/stoner rock and high energy garage rock and punk. Another thing is that we are not originally from CA, we are from Milwaukee where the weather is gloomy a lot of the year, which may have had an influence as well. No matter how long we’ve lived in CA, we still hold on to where we come from. Word play is fun too.

There’s a pretty big break between Worst Coast Scenario in 2015 and Anxiety, Disbelief, Wonder. from this year. What lead to that lengthy break?

That break wasn’t really intentional. We put a lot of time and money into Worst Coast Scenario, pressed vinyl and did several small tours within that time. We both play in other bands, play other instruments, and have careers outside of music that we are both passionate about. It’s tough to balance it all and be as productive as we want to be while giving energy to all the things we care about. In the time between, while playing and writing with our other projects, it inspired us to come back together and write some new songs.

When most people talk about the California music scene, you immediately think they just mean LA. What is the music scene like down in San Diego?

It’s super supportive and diverse. Saturated in a good way. It’s always changing but there has always been great venues that support the local scene. There are tons of rad local and touring bands to go see and play with (in our experience). We have been on seven West Coast tours and I think we’re lucky to have SD as a home base.

Do you think location matter when you’re trying to make it as a band or is it more important to just garner a local following and go from there?

I’m sure location matters a bit and a local following is great of course. I’m not sure if it’s as simple as all that anymore since we are all so connected now through social media. We are part of a community of other bands in other cities and their friends and followers come out to support. We probably could have moved to LA years ago to try and “make it” but… we like it here. We are having a good time and LA isn’t far for us.

What are you hoping to accomplish as a band?

Since we’ve been doing it on our own and somewhat under the radar for so long, its time time to get out of our comfort zone. We are looking to jump on bigger tours, play festivals, and get our material out into the world to those who may be into it. We are bad at being in a band. We will write and record music till our heads fall off, but knowing what is necessary to propel us further than where we are is daunting and unclear some times.

If we continue to love working together, stay true to our creative process, and have a blast playing live after this long, we’ve accomplished a lot.

What was the writing process like for Anxiety, Disbelief, Wonder.? How about the recording process?

The writing was actually pretty slow. We wrote it over a couple of years while we were writing and recording with other projects. We would write a couple of new songs, play them out live, get comfortable with them, sometimes rewrite something. It got to the point when we would play a show and most of the songs on the set weren’t recorded yet. It made sense to get back in the studio. We’ve been recording with Mike Kamoo at Earthling Studios here in San Diego. It’s always a fun learning experience with him. As a two piece we get a lot done in a short amount of time. We live tracked baritone guitars and drums, then over-dubbed with more layered guitars and bass. The tracking process goes rather quickly. Mixing our sound to how we want is what gets time consuming. With past recordings our approach to the sound was garage forward and aggressive. In comparison, this new recording has music that relies more on subtlety and mood. The songs still have a heavy-ness to them but a less aggressive tone and attitude. We felt a growth with this recording.

What should we expect from the band now that the release has been out for a couple months? Any big plans for the rest of 2018?

We are working on a video together, total DIY, which we are super excited about. That should be finished by the end of August. We have written a couple new songs since the release and intend to work on a couple more. Maybe get back in the studio before winter. We have some shows coming up in LA and San Diego this summer, but other than that no tours are scheduled this summer which is a first.

Thanks for your time. Where can our readers keep up with you?

@gloomsdaysdoompop on Instagram for the most up to date goings on.

We post some on Facebook and you can visit our website.

Interview: If Walls Could Talk Discuss New Album, Detroit, and More

If Walls Could Talk

If Walls Could Talk released a deluxe edition of What Would They Say? recently. Tony Burke and Nick DiStefano took some time to chat with us about the band, the Detroit music scene, and more. Check out the full interview below.

When the band started in 2013, what were your expectations?

Tony: Well, we like to set our expectations pretty high. Not to mention, all of us are in it for the long run. So, our short term goals were simple like playing with well established local acts, creating our first professional EP, and putting together an entertaining live set. But, in the back of our minds, I’m pretty sure all of us have been just waiting to play at Soldier Field with Coldplay one day.

Have you met or exceeded them so far?

Tony: Now that I think about it, we’ve been pretty consistent with both meeting and exceeding our goals. Not only do we have our first EP out, but we have a deluxe version coming out.

How did the Detroit music scene impact your sound?

Nick: I feel that the Detroit music scene is prominently pop punk and alternative. I know for a few of us here, we started playing making pop punk music originally. I know that has seriously influenced my music personally, and you’ll see a lot of that in Static. Lots of octaves and power chords!

What is the local scene like there?

Tony: If I had one word to describe the local scene in Detroit, I would way it’s definitely a community. Everyone knows each other and is very engaged in the scene. It doesn’t really feel like bands are competing with each other. Everyone just wants to see the other band succeed at whatever they are doing.

What has been the most challenging thing about building up a local following for the band and then having it expand beyond Detroit?

Nick: At first it was just about getting in front of the right audience. In Detroit, we’ve expanded greatly and have now sold out multiple shows here. There have been a few markets that we’ve broken into well, like Grand Rapids and Chicago. However, we’re still getting our foot in the door in others more east of Detroit.

When did you know you wanted to release a deluxe edition of ‘What Would They Say?’ and what does it include?

Nick: We grew so much from the release of the initial EP, and we had so much more content we wanted to share with everyone. This includes music videos, songs, and renditions of songs. So when we started talking about our next steps, it felt so natural to end this cycle of our band with a deluxe version.

What is the band focusing on next?

Nick: Right now, it’s writing. We want to be able to improve our live show so much, but also really make our music stand out on a recorded track too.

Outside of the band, do you have any other hobbies?

Tony: I’m a lover of the arts. Outside of music, I like creative writing and even dancing. Most people probably don’t know this about me, but I’m actually a professional ballroom dancer.

Thank you for your time! Where can our readers keep up with the band?

Nick: It’s our pleasure! You can find us really anywhere. Here are a few links:

https://www.ifwallscouldtalk.band
https://www.facebook.com/ifwallscouldtalkband
https://www.twitter.com/iftalkingwalls
https://www.instagram.com/ifwallscouldtalkband
Snapchat: iwctband

Also follow us on Spotify, Apple Music, and Google Play music!

SoCal Spotlight: Swerve

Swerve

Swerve is the latest SoCal band to grab our attention. They’re playing The Bootleg on June 26th with support from TEST to celebrate their EP release. Check out more information about the band and how they got their start.

Hometown: Los Angeles
When the band formed: 2015
Members:
Greg Mahdesian – Vocals, guitar
Ryan Berti – Guitar, vocals
Brandon Duncan – Bass, vocals, production
Mark Garner – Drums, jokes

When did you first know you wanted to be in a band?

GM: I think I’ve always wanted to be in a band, but didn’t know how to put myself out there until a few years ago. I started off doing solo stuff with my acoustic guitar and then it kind of organically became a band once we started playing live. It’s more fun that way and the music is better, and no one ever asks “who’s your favorite solo artist?”. It’s always “what’s your favorite band?”.

RB: I’ve always thought that music sounded better when there was some synergy between the people making it, and figured that’d be the goal.

BD: Wait, I’m in a band?

MG: When Titanic came out, I saw it and thought, “man, I never want to be on a boat like that” and bought a drum set. The rest is history.

How did the current lineup come to be?

RB: Greg asked if I played guitar, and if I could show up on-time to practice, and I said yes to both.

GM: Brandon produced the first EP and since he knew the songs so well I asked if he could play bass while I put together a live outfit, and he’s been in it ever since. Ryan and I were buddies from school and he asked if he could join the band after several margaritas at Las Perlas in downtown. Mark just kind of showed up one day.

MG: Greg said he had dirt on me, and I didn’t really want to take the risk.

BD: I’m pretty sure it was all an accident.

With all the little pockets of music scenes in SoCal, how do you go about checking out the local scene and finding new bands to listen to or even perform with?

GM: Friends will invite us out to check out their band or their friends’ bands- it’s like a way less lame version of corporate networking. We get asked to support some bands and then we do the same, and hopefully you like each other and become fans of one another and make a connection.

BD: I just wait for the youngsters in the band to tell me what’s cool, and also where to show up for gigs and when.

MG: I don’t know anyone outside of the music scene so it’s basically all I do.

RB: All of the local bands seem to have some network of friend-bands, so it’s just a matter of going to shows and learning what’s going on outside of your own friend-band-network.

What’s your favorite thing about the SoCal scene? What’s one thing you wish you could change about it?

RB: The number of great local/national/international bands that play in Los Angeles on any given night of the week is crazy. I wouldn’t change a thing.

GM: I like how surprisingly welcoming it is. We kind of showed up late to the party and have still found a home, made friends and all that. It’s probably a little too dispersed to really feel like a proper scene though- there’s a lot of micro-scenes. I don’t really have anything else to compare it to, but I like it.

There’s no doubt that this is a crowded place. So do you ever find it difficult to build up even just a solid local following? How does the band go about doing that?

GM: The competition probably forces you to be better. There’s a million different things going on every night, so it’s always easier for someone not to see you than to check you out. Maybe it forces you to think too career oriented as well, and you can end up getting myopic and thinking that LA is all that there is. I mostly think that if you show up and play well, get better and be open to new ideas without sacrificing what you are, and put in the hustle, you’ll at least bring people to shows.

BD: Greg asks me that same question every other week….

How do you handle the band’s social media presence? Where can the readers follow you?

RB: It’s usually an amalgamation of our individual pictures and videos, and we have friends that help us find a common theme/color in that mess.

MG: I try to really take the reigns and approach everything with a hands-off, but controlling vibe.

GM: We know who we are, so we try to just be ourselves when we post and interact with others online…with help from people that know how to post and interact with others.

BD: Also leave that up to the youngsters. But after all, we are a band, so what we’re really interested in are listeners!

Do you have a favorite SoCal spot to play? What makes it your favorite?

GM: Playing the Troubadour was an amazing experience, and I’m stoked to be headlining the Bootleg for our EP release show. I’ve always wanted to play there and to be the main attraction feels good.

What is the band working on right now?

GM: Tons of new music. We’re expanding our sound, going heavier and also prettier. Headlining the Bootleg June 26th, and then getting out of LA to see what we’ve been missing.

BD: Mostly I’m trying to galvanize these youngsters’ livers so that when we go out on the road they can keep up with the old geezer!

MG: I’m not entirely sure… there’s a ballad in there though. And experimenting with feedback.

RB: Fuckin’ bangers.

Interview: The Molice discuss their influences and touring in the U.S.

The Molice

The Molice hail from Japan and have been touring in the U.S. lately. We had a chance to ask them some questions about their music, how the scene differs here and in Japan, and more. Check it out!

When the band first started, did you know exactly what you wanted your sound to be like?

Rinko: Of course, I always know what I want. But it also happen to get unexpected sound and song in the band. I really like the moment. And in addition, I only know what I want.

Yuzuru: It is not exactly, but what I wanted to do was very clear. It still does not change.

Paro: No… but I always believe my feelings. So I know I can always get what I want as long as I am honest with my feelings.

What led to the blend of 70s, 80s, and 90s influences?

Rinko: I can say for sure is that I really love a lot of 70s, 80s, and 90s music.  Actually I’m not sure what is happened in my brain. I don’t have how to. But I really feel to connecting to SPACE when I make songs.

Yuzuru: I think rhythm does not get old. Rinko is an excellent rhythm guitarist. Although, there is a fashionable beat by the era, I think that fundamental groove will not change in any era.Our music is based on it. In my head, all kinds of favorite music of every era are packed. Classical, Jazz, rock, hip hop and electro music. I express such a lot of love for music in the music of THE MOLICE through my guitar.

The band is still fairly new to touring in the U.S., so what has that been like?

Rinko: We have a really wonderful touring. I am very happy to be able to know that our music can make audience enjoyable in U.S.!

Yuzuru: I am very excited to receive a lot of stimulation. I feel that the audience has taken our music.

Paro: I feel people has a big heart in U.S. They can accept all kinds of values

How would you say the music scene in the U.S. varies from Japan?

Yuzuru: There are a lot of things I think, and as I start talking, I’ll need many pages!  Both USA and Japan have major and indies, I think it is the same that there are artists of various genres such as rock, hip hop, and  electronica in USA and Japan. I think the music scene is what the audience will make it. The American audience is very natural and clearly enjoy music. And it is very energetic. Such an audience is making up the American scenes. That’s the biggest difference.

What was it like recording “Round Round Round” in Buffalo, NY?

Rinko: We made it with the same team at GCR studio in Buffalo from 2015. It was very smooth recording. I was relaxed at the studio, so I could let my mind have many ideas. Keyboard phase of ‘Round Round Round’ is good example.

Yuzuru: It was wonderful. I was able to make the sounds as they imagined.

Paro: I am hung up on beating four beat like marching through Earth. It fits with the music video, too. And I was easy to record it in Buffalo, NY!

What’s next for the band after you wrap up your current tour?

Rinko: We are always interested in making new sound. It is our core part.

Yuzuru: To create new music. To prepare for the next tour. And I want to find new creative things.

Paro: We keep on trying to do what we want to do. Anytime!

Thanks for your time! Where can our readers keep up with the band?

THE MOLICE:  Please check out the band’s website, instruments, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube channel and more.

Interview: Modern Whale talk new single and what’s next

Robbie from Modern Whale answered some questions about the band’s expectations, their recent single, and more. Check out the full interview below.

When Modern Whale first started, what were your expectations for the band?

I make my living as a record producer and typically compromise for the sake of the artist. Modern Whale was simply something I was doing for myself, something that was freeing from my normal creative environment.

Has it exceeded those expectations?

Modern Whale has certainly exceeded my expectations! Initially I had no plan of releasing anything as it was just something I was doing for myself. It has been amazing to be featured on Vevo and Spotify playlists and reach a larger audience.

For your music video for “The Dirt,” you worked with Raviv Ullman, Martin Spanjers, and John F. Beach. What was that experience like?

Raviv, Marty and John are a very talented team and their work speaks for itself. I’m thankful that they were available to make time to share their creativity. I think the video is wonderful. 🙂

You just played a show at The Bowery Electric, how did that go?

The Bowery Electric show felt like a family reunion. Modern Whale shared the bill with War Twins, Micky James and The Worst Humans – all friends of ours. The show was a success and thankfully packed.

Your sound can’t really be pinned down to one genre. Who are some of your biggest influences?

I really love Phoenix, Led Zeppelin and Fela Kuti. My taste is pretty wide.

How would you say the band’s sound has progressed over the years?

Modern Whale is technically not even a year old yet! With this said, the live shows and each single release have taught me valuable lessons about everything form production to how a song can evolve outside of the studio.

Any plans you can tell us about for the rest of 2018?

The plan is to release at least 3 more songs this year!

Thank you for your time! Where’s the best place to keep up with the band?

Modern Whale on Spotify and @modernwhalemusic on Instagram.

Interview: Josh Wheatley talks Nottingham music scene and new single

Josh Wheatley took some time to discuss his new single, the Nottingham music scene, and more with us. Check out the interview and his new single “I Know You.”

When did you first get into music? How did it all start for you?

I started playing music because I was bored with college. My first ‘gig’ was Acoustic Rooms at Rescue Rooms in Nottingham. As first gigs go it was pretty good. Band of Skulls were playing in the main room, when the gig finished many people came out and stayed to watch my set.

What is the music scene in Nottingham like?

The music scene is great! Very diverse, with many different genres. It’s a fantastic place to build relationships with fellow musicians.

Where is your favorite spot to play a show?

Undoubtedly the Bodega in Nottingham. I’ve supported some of my favourite artists there.

Who are some of the other local artists we should check out?

Definitely Felix M-B. He’s just released a brilliant EP. Daudi Matsiko. Beautiful sounds! Big fan of Silver Wilson too. Their new song Let It Go is excellent. Also, my good friend George Gretton. He’s releasing new music soon (I hope).

What was your writing and recording process like for “I Know You”?

Writing-wise it happened pretty quickly. Recording was a little longer, but still a smooth process. It’s a song I’ve sat on for a little while.

What can we expect from the rest of the upcoming EP?

More songs like “I Know You.” I had the absolute pleasure of working with Josh Rumble (from Anteros) on Worry and Saviour, and they’re great fun to play live too.

What has it been like getting the attention of people at places like BBC and Clash Magazine?

Absolutely mad! I’ve read a lot on Clash, so to see my name featured was just a little bit cool for me.

What else can we expect from you in 2018 aside from the EP?

I’m heading on tour with New York Tourists in May. Very excited about that. That and just working on more music.

Thank you for your time! Where is the best place for our readers to follow you?

Instagram, Twitter, Soundcloud – @joshisok
Facebook – Josh Wheatley

Interview: Capital North Talks Hobbies, Recording Process, and More

Photo credit: Paul Morgan

Anthony of Capital North took some time to discuss their new EP, the recording process, hobbies, and much more. Check out the interview below.

How did you two go from Lights In The Sky to making music together as Capital North?

When LITS ended we took a good 2 year break and when we decided to come back together, so much had changed. The idea and concepts that made up LITS were almost too far gone. The new music was a different style and the band members except for Jonathan and myself, were totally different. It was time to reinvent ourselves, and we decided a name change was in order. The transition honestly seemed seamless enough because Jonathan and myself had always been the primary songwriters and the new songs,to some extent,  are just a reflection of our lives and growing up. Capital North is really just another chapter in our lives, Chapter one was LITS and now chapter 2 is CN.

What was your writing and recording process like for Sea To Sky?

We wrote the album over the course of almost two years – from coming up with concepts, demoing, pre-production, recording, and post-production. It definitely was not a quick process and as far as the songs go, we just wrote what we were feeling and what was relevant to us at the time. There was no grand plan for the album. It is merely a reflection of our own lives and what was going on around us. I think that a lot of bands use a kind of formula when it comes to these things and honestly, it shows. They say you have your whole life to write your first album and I think that is apparent in so many of my favorite bands growing up. I won’t name names, but how many times have you heard a debut album and thought to yourself “oh my god this album changed my life” just to be let down with follow-ups. I once wrote a long-winded email to one of my favorite post-hardcore bands growing up BEGGING them not to release their newest album because in my eyes it was so anticlimactic that it would discredit the albums that made them timeless. Needless to say, they released it anyway and I’m pretty sure they didn’t even read the email and, with all of that being said, it flopped so hard. For reasons like that, I try not to have some set predetermined process because I feel it takes away from how genuine the music is or should be.

The video for “Glass Houses” is great. Who did you work with on it?

Jesse Lynch from the band Alistair Hennessey, who really does amazing work and is an awesome friend of ours. We really enjoyed working with him and definitely plan to again many more times in the future! The video also features our friends Joseph Biagas from “Setting Sunrise” and Andres from “Andrés”, as well as a bunch of our friends and family.

What has the lead up to the release been like? Are you excited for people to dive into the new music?

SO SO SO SO busy and so expensive lol. From getting our live stage set and all of the goodies we have for you guys that just add to our aesthetic, to getting CDs pressed and merch made, we are certainly busy and broke haha. We have also been planning our release schedule and working with PR to make the biggest splash we can! Honestly, we have been non-stop busy, but in the best way possible. I’m so excited to hear what people think of the album as a whole piece of work. I think that people will really relate well to it and that makes me excited to see that hopefully. I can’t wait for people to really pick the music apart and try to apply the themes to their lives. It’s always fun when people ask you what something is supposed to mean or what it refers to and you tell them to figure it out on their own. Not because it’s some great secret, but more because we write it in such a way that we really want it to apply to the listener’s own life in some capacity.

With the EP coming out in the early half of 2018, what are your plans for the rest of the year?

I would say a few tours should be in order and you should definitely keep an eye out for that! When we took our break to write the album and to start getting everything geared up for the new project, we sold our van (RIP Bernie) so it wouldn’t just be collecting dust as well as costing us a bunch, and I think it’s about time to get a new one and put it to good use. Other than that, we don’t like to rest and I wouldn’t count out some new music. We also have a few really exciting/interesting projects going on right now with this music that will be a lot of fun to share with everyone.

Aside from music, do you have any other hobbies or jobs?

We both love hanging out with our dogs, road trips, traveling, camping, going to shows, cooking (you’ll often find us barbecuing on tour instead of eating fast food), getting lost, exploring dangerous places, hanging with loved ones, and having unique new experiences. I love working on cars and has been known to do oil changes in the middle of the parking lot at Walmart on the van at 2 AM as well as surfing. Jon loves to work out and do Yoga and Pilates. But overall, we really like to just have fun and enjoy life and make the most meaningful memories we can! Ultimately, that is what we draw our songs meanings from ☺.

Thank you for your time! Where can our readers keep up with the band?

All of the usual suspects! Twitter/Instagram/YouTube/Facebook (@capitalnorthca). <3